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Dr. Rick w/ BabyOur Advance Team is on the ground on Leyte Island in the Philippines delivering direct patient care to hundreds of people who need it. One doctor & one nurse seeing hundreds of patients. That is changing, as more Heart to Heart International volunteers are arriving.

Our Advance Team:
Rick Randolph, MD
is a physician based in the Kansas City Metro, and a HHI board member.
Sue Mangicaro, RN 
is volunteering for the Advance Team, on “loan” from Welch Allyn where she is the Director of Clinical Affairs.
Julie Hefner,
a HHI staffer & Team Lead

What follows is some of Dr. Rick’s observations during his time treating patients in the disaster zone.  To read comments from Sue in Part One, click here.

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2013-11-19 14.42.27RICK: This deployment was off to a hectic start for me.  I was out of town when the Typhoon struck and I committed to deploy with HHI while in New Orleans.  That compressed the preparation time since I had patients scheduled for the week.  My practice is used to my trips and generously accommodated my request for time off.

After meeting with the Heart to Heart staff, Julie Hefner and I flew to Los Angeles to meet up with Sue Mangicaro and then on to Cebu, Philippines.  It was a long flight over a total of 14 time zones and we were exhausted the day we arrived with jet lag.  

At the Ormoc city hall we met Commander Joseph Ring of the U.S. Navy destroyer USS Mustin.  He had two helicopters and was the on scene commander for the US military lead relief efforts.  Very handy.  Upon our arrival, we received a request for medical support for a village in the hills.  Cmdr. Ring dispatched a helicopter to the village and within 30 minutes we received a medical assessment from the Navy medic that there was no major medical needs, although they did desperately need food and clean water.  That saved us a day of walking into the mountains (the only other way to get there) for a place where there wasn’t a great medical need.  

2013-11-22 15.31.53At our first clinic at a local church where we were assigned, we saw about 75 patients in a shortened day. There were some injuries from the typhoon and a lot of illness from the contaminated water and the smoke in the air from burning debris (intentionally burned for disposal).  There were also several with chronic illness and a significant number of those who were severely stressed by their circumstances who can’t sleep or who somaticize {ed. note: anxiety converted into physical symptoms}.

2013-11-20 13.29.15The force of the Typhoon is evident in the substantial structures as well as the small houses.  The larger structures absorbed more force and roofs and walls were taken down.  The smaller houses were less substantial and had less structural strength and many were totally destroyed.  There is debris everywhere. The roads are mostly cleared to some extent.  Smoke is everywhere as people burn trash and debris. 

2013-11-20 07.48.28

Waiting to charge cell phones outside of motel in Ormoc City

There is no electricity and probably won’t be for at least 6 months.  Generators are the only source of power.  The hotel where we stay {pic on right} has a large one and has established dozens of outlets outside the hotel for people to charge their cell phones, run their nebulizers for asthma and just watch the TV in the lobby for news.

Ormoc City is a functioning city.  The economy is turning back on and the health of the people isn’t too bad. The streets are bustling with activity.  Tacloban, on the other hand, has disintegrated.  There are many internally displaced persons from Tacloban in Ormoc despite the 100 kilometer distance.

 

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